Social Justice

Engage issues you are passionate about. Develop a vision of justice. Learn community building skills. Hone analytical tools to identify and address oppressive and unjust structures. Co-create knowledge with faculty, peers, and community leaders. Experience the relevance of your education with a major in Social Justice at Dominican.
T-Shirt Declarations 
Learn from community knowledge. Cultivate critical awareness. Take informed action.

Bachelor of Arts in Social Justice

Social Justice (formerly Religion) coursework illuminates the larger contexts, histories, cultural, political, and religious dimensions that form and condition individuals and societies. Central to this endeavor is finding solidarity with marginalized communities, as well as listening to and learning from community members and leaders. This program provides ample opportunities and established partnerships with communities to make deep connections that will strengthen your learning and shape your path. The work of this major culminates in a sustained research project, guided by a faculty mentor, that addresses a current issue faced in our local community.

For program courses and specifics, download:
Social Justice Major Requirements and Course Descriptions (PDF)

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze contemporary social and/or environmental issues with attention to their ethical dimensions.
  • Explain the links between well-being, social justice, and diverse worldviews.
  • Engage with communities, from local to global, to enhance civic knowledge and skills.
  • Synthesize and apply knowledge in larger social contexts.

Hear from our Students

The new Social Justice major builds on our Service-Learning program’s existing minor in Community Action and Social Change (CASC) Here’s what some of our CASC minors are saying:


Mia_2

“We need to make it our practice to create a positive change for future generations so that they don’t live with this fear. If we want a kinder, more empathetic, and humane society, we must learn to listen to one another and not limit ourselves to patterns.”
--Mia Nguyen ‘21

 

 

 

Dylan

“My family immigrated to the United States in 2005, and had to navigate the ins and outs of a new country that we knew nothing about. By serving at RotaCare, I have been given the platform to help a community that I connect strongly with. I have learned that by coming to Dominican I did not just pick this school to spend four years at, I picked a community to be a part of. The people I’ve met, the interactions I’ve had and the professors that have taught me will forever have an impact on me.”
--Dylan Martins ‘19

 

Amelia

“I’ve learned how practice and theory support each other — together they create a never ending cycle of growth and learning. I observed and participated in my community partner’s events, got to know its members, then compared what I observed with the theories of social change I was learning in class. This spurred more questions, which I was then able to explore during my next community experience. This cycle of learning is incredibly applicable to all fields of study, as well as to one’s daily personal growth.”
--Amelia Taylor ‘21