Past Low Residency MFA in Creative Writing Guest Speakers

The low residency MFA in Creative Writing degree can be completed in two years through distance mentorship and twice yearly campus residencies. During our residencies in January (8 days) and June (11 days), students will participate in workshops, craft talks, afternoon panels and evening readings. Students engage with Dominican faculty and an illustrious lineup of guest speakers in poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, narrative / poetic medicine, memoir, and publishing.

Past Residency Guest Speakers


January 2018 Guest Speakers

 

Tom Barbash

Tom Barbash is the author of four books as well as reviews, essays, and articles for publications such as McSweeney’s, Tin House, Narrative Magazine, Zyzzyva, and the New York Times. His short story collection Stay Up With Me was nominated for the Folio Prize and picked as a Best Book of the Year by the Independent of London, NPR, and the San Francisco Chronicle. His novel The Last Good Chance was awarded The California Book Award. His nonfiction book On Top of the World, about the horrific fate of the bond firm Cantor Fitzgerald on 9/11, was a New York Times Bestseller and landed him on the Today Show and Larry King Live. His most recent book, The Dakota Winters, is due out in Dec 2018 in the US, UK, Canada France, and Germany. A well-regarded speaker, panelist, and interviewer, Barbash teaches writing at California College of the Arts.


Laura Cogan

Laura Cogan is the Editor and Executive Director of ZYZZYVA. She holds a B.A. and an M.A. from New York University.


Carolyn Cooke

Carolyn Cooke's novel, Daughters of the Revolution, was named one of the ten best books of 2011 by The San Francisco Chronicle and one of the Reviewers' Favorite novels of that year by The New Yorker magazine. Her debut collection of fiction, The Bostons, was a winner of the PEN/ Bingham Award, a finalist for the PEN/L.L. Winship Award, a runner-up for the PEN/Hemingway Award, and was named one of the best books of the year by The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times. A recipient of fellowships from Bread Loaf, the National Endowment for the Arts, the California Arts Council, the Djerassi Foundation, Macdowell, Vermont Studio Center, and Yaddo, Carolyn is a professor in the interdisciplinary MFA Program at California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco.


Molly Giles

Molly Giles had a distinguished career teaching Fiction Writing at San Francisco State University and the University of Arkansas. She has published a novel, IRON SHOES, and four award-winning collections of short stories: Rough Translations, Creek Walk, Bothered, and, most recently, All The Wrong Places, which won the Spokane Prize for Fiction.


Terry Lucas

Terry Lucas is the author of two award-winning poetry chapbooks, Altar Call and If They Have Ears to Hear, and two full-length poetry collections: In This Room and Dharma Rain. His work has received numerous awards, including the 2014 Crab Orchard Review Feature Award in Poetry, the fifth annual Littoral Press Poetry Prize, and five Pushcart Prize nominations. Terry’s poems, reviews, and essays have appeared in dozens of national literary journals. He has taught in the Chicago Public School System as a Master Poet in the Von Steuben Metropolitan Science Center’s Writing Center. Terry is a graduate of New England College MFA and is the former co-executive editor of Trio House Press.  He currently offers freelance poetry coaching and is on the advisory board of Trio House Press.


Katie Peterson

Katie Peterson is the author of four books of poetry, including A Piece of Good News, which will be published in February 2019, and the editor of the New Selected Poems of Robert Lowell. She has received fellowships from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. She is the Director of the Creative Writing Program at the University of California at Davis. She lives in Berkeley, CA with her husband and daughter.


Peg Alford Pursell

Peg Alford Pursell is the author of SHOW HER A FLOWER, A BIRD, A SHADOW, the 2017 INDIES Book of the Year for Literary Fiction, and selected by Poets & Writers magazine for its second annual “5 over 50” feature. Her second book A GIRL GOES INTO THE FOREST is forthcoming from Dzanc Books in July 2019. Her work appears in many journals and anthologies, including RHINO, The Cortland Review, and Permafrost. She is the director and founder of the national reading series Why There Are Words, and of WTAW Press, a publisher of exceptional literary books. She earned her MFA in Creative Writing from the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers.


Carlos Rodriguez

Carlos Rodriguez, MA is a poet and playwright with poetry in various small presses/journals, and his one-act play, "A Place You Can Go," was performed in San Francisco through the Playwright's Foundation. He has studied creative writing at three universities - University of Arizona, University of CA - Davis, and Stanford University - and has taught creative writing at both UC-Davis and Dominican University of CA, where he currently teaches. His interest in narrative / poetic medicine stems from his study of the psychoanalytic endeavor of "putting words to feelings."


Marianne Rogoff

Marianne Rogoff, PhD is the author of the memoir Silvie's Life, which has been translated into Portuguese, adopted to teach medical ethics, and optioned for film. Six stories in her 2016 collection Love Is Blind in One Eye: 7 Stories were nominated for the Pushcart Prize. In 2017, a novella-in-flash was shortlisted for the international Bath Flash Fiction Award. Her travel stories have appeared in The Best Travel Writing and The Best Women’s Travel Writing, including a Solas Bronze Award. She has also published numerous essays and book reviews in The Rumpus, San Francisco Chronicle, and Bloomsbury Review.


Nina Schuyler

Nina Schuyler is the author of The Translator, which won the 2014 Next Generation Indie Book Award and was shortlisted for the William Saroyan International Writing Prize. Her first novel, The Painting, was nominated for the Northern California Book Award and was named a "Year's Finest Best Book" by the San Francisco Chronicle and a "fearless debut" by MSNBC. It’s been translated into Chinese, Portuguese, and Serbian. Nina’s stories have been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and her work has appeared in ZYZZYVA, Santa Clara Review, Fugue, The Meadowland Review, The Battered Suitcase, and other literary journals. She teaches creative writing at the University of San Francisco and writing classes at Book Passage. She lives in Northern California, with her husband and two sons.


Ayako Takahashi

Ayako Takahashi is an Associate Professor of English at Nagaoka University of Technology in Nagaoka, Japan. She is the author of Reading on Gary Snyder (Shichosha 2018) and co-translator of Anthology of Contemporary American Women Poets: Anne Waldman, Diane di Prima, Joanne Kyger and Jane Hirshfield (Shichosha 2012). Her articles have appeared in numerous journals, including Comparative Literature Studies (PENN STATE PRESS).


Tony Vidal

Tony Vidal  (Producer, Director, Writer) studied screenwriting at USC and later became head story analyst at Orion Pictures and The Ladd Company. He was hired by Summertime Films to co-write Her Best Move, an indy feature about girls soccer that was distributed by MGM and aired on The Disney Channel. Tony then wrote The Prankster, a teen comedy/romance produced by his own production company, Prankster Entertainment. The Prankster was distributed by Strand Releasing on numerous platforms including Netflix and Hulu, and had a successful two year run on Showtime and Starz. Recently, Tony wrote and directed Baja, which was theatrically released by AMC Independent in 2018, and is currently on Amazon and all major platforms.


Ryoichi Wago

Ryoichi Wago is a poet and a high school teacher in Fukushima, Japan. He is the author of multiple books and a winner of Nakahara Chuya prize in 1998 and Baisui prize in 2006. His work Pebbles of Poetry (Shi no Tsubute) is a compilation of Twitter posts written while facing the 3.11 earthquake and Fukushima Daiichi power station accident. This work, translated into French by Corinne Atlan as Jets de poemes: Dans le vif de Fukushima, won Le Prix de poesie de la revue NUNC 2017.


Alexa Weinstein

Alexa Weinstein is a writer, editor, and teacher. She moved to the Bay Area in 1982, at the age of ten, and spent the next two decades living in Marin County, Berkeley, and San Francisco’s Mission District. After earning an MFA in English and Creative Writing from Mills College, she moved to Portland, Oregon in 2001. She now provides writing and editing support to graduate students, helps working academics publish their research, and facilitates workshops with Write Around Portland. Whenever possible, she hangs out with her rad kid and/or goes to the river. She is currently finishing her first book: an essay collection about finding a place in language where you can speak from all your parts.


Maw Shien Win

Maw Shein Win is a poet, editor, and educator who lives and works in the Bay Area. Her writing has appeared in many journals and several anthologies, including MARY: A Journal of New Writing, Cimarron Review, Poetry International, Fanzine, and others. She often collaborates with visual artists, musicians, and other writers. A collaborative book with paintings by artist Mark Dutcher, Ruins of a glittering palace, was published by SPA/Commonwealth Projects. She is a member of the San Francisco Writers' Grotto and is the first poet laureate of El Cerrito. Win's poetry chapbook Score and Bone is on Nomadic Press. Her full-length collection Invisible Gifts: Poems was published by Manic D Press in April 2018.


June 2018 Guest Speakers

 

Ellery Akers

Ellery Akers is the author of two collections of poems, Knocking on the Earth and Practicing the Truth, as well as a children’s novel, Sarah’s Waterfall. She has won thirteen national writing awards, including the Poetry International Prize, the John Masefield Award, and an Independent Publisher Book Award. Her poetry has been featured on National Public Radio and has appeared in such journals as Poetry, The New York Times Magazine, The Sun, and The American Poetry Review. An award-winning visual artist as well, Akers has exhibited her artwork in museums and galleries nationally. She recently won the Watson Cross, Jr. Award from the National Watercolor Society.


Ellen Bass

Ellen Bass’s most recent books of poetry are Like a Beggar and The Human Line. She co-edited, with Florence Howe, the first major anthology of women’s poetry, No More Masks! An Anthology of Poems by Women. Her poetry has appeared frequently in The New Yorker, The American Poetry Review, and many other journals. Among her awards are a Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, a Fellowship from the California Arts Council, three Pushcart Prizes, The Lambda Literary Award, The Pablo Neruda Prize, The Larry Levis Prize and the New Letters Prize. Her nonfiction books include Free Your Mind: The Book for Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Youth and The Courage to Heal: A Guide for Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse. She is a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and teaches in the MFA writing program at Pacific University.


Rick Benjamin

Rick Benjamin is the Associate Director of Community Engagement at the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center of UCSB. He served as the State Poet of Rhode Island from 2013-2016 and has taught at Brown University, the Rhode Island School of Design, the MFA Program in Interdisciplinary Arts at Goddard College, and in community and assisted living centers—where he has passed good time in the company of people who range in age from six to ninety-six. His poems and essays have appeared in PRØOF, Watershed, The Providence Journal, Tongue, 350.org, The Writer’s Circle, American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics, Urthona: An International Buddhist Journal of the Arts, Home: An Anthology of Ars Poetica, and La Petite Zine.


Rebecca Black

Rebecca Black’s first book, “Cottonlandia,” won a Juniper Prize from the University of Massachusetts Press. “Hers is a poetry full of promise and pain, migrating from Otis Redding to nanotechnology, “ writes New Yorker poetry editor Kevin Young. A former Wallace Stegner at Stanford University and National Endowment For the Arts fellow, in 2011 she was a Fulbright visiting professor at the Seamus Heaney Center in Belfast, Northern Ireland. She has been the Director of Creative Writing at Santa Clara University and a member of the MFA faculty at UNC Greensboro. She lives in Albany, California where she serves as the city’s 2016-2020 Poet Laureate.


Kim Culbertson

Kim Culbertson is the award-winning author of the YA novels Songs for a Teenage Nomad (Sourcebooks 2010), Instructions for a Broken Heart (Sourcebooks 2011), Catch a Falling Star (Scholastic 2014), The Possibility of Now (Scholastic 2016), and The Wonder of Us (Scholastic 2017). Much of her inspiration for her novels comes from the work she’s done as a high school teacher since 1997. In 2012, Kim wrote her eBook novella The Liberation of Max McTrue for her students, who, over the years, have taught her far more than she has taught them. She currently lives in Nevada City, CA, with her husband and daughter.


Albert Flynn DeSilver

Albert Flynn DeSilver is a poet, memoirist, novelist, speaker, and workshop leader. His work has appeared in more than 100 literary journals worldwide including ZYZZYVA, New American Writing, Hanging Loose, Jubilat, Exquisite Corpse, and many others. He is the author of several books of poems, including Letters to Early Street and Walking Tooth & Cloud—as well as the memoir Beamish Boy, which was named one of Kirkus Reviews “Best Books of 2012.” His latest book is Writing as a Path to Awakening: A Year to Becoming an Excellent Writer & Living an Awakened Life. Albert served as Marin County California’s very first Poet Laureate from 2008-2010. DeSilver teaches at the Omega Institute, Esalen Institute, the 1440 Multiversity, and at writing conferences nationally.


Courtney Donovan

Dr. Courtney Donovan is a health geographer who specializes in visual methodologies and narrative medicine. She examines how graphic narratives convey the importance of place, embodiment, and experience in overlooked health encounters and perspectives. Her research explores art production as a methodological approach and as a tool that promotes social justice and health equity. She is the co-editor of Writing Intimacy into Feminist Geography. She is a Truth Fellow with the Yerba Buena Center for Arts, and currently developing a community-based multimedia narrative medicine project, which aims to foster dialogue on Bay Area health disparities.


Rebecca Foust

Rebecca Foust has published five books of poetry, most recently Paradise Drive, reviewed in venues including the Times Literary Supplement, Georgia Review, Harvard Review, and Philadelphia Inquirer. Her poems, essays, short stories, and reviews appear widely. Recent Recognition includes the James Hearst Poetry Prize judged by Jane Hirshfield, American Literary Review’s Fiction Prize judged by Garth Greenwell, fellowships from MacDowell, Sewanee, and the Frost Place, and recent appointment as Marin County Poet Laureate. She is the poetry editor and writes a weekly column for Women's Voices for Change, and an assistant editor reading fiction for Narrative Magazine.


John Fox

John Fox is a poet and certified poetry therapist. He is author of Poetic Medicine: The Healing Art of Poem-Making (1997) and Finding What You Didn't Lose: Expressing Your Truth and Creativity Through Poem-Making (1995) and numerous essays in a range of books on subjects of spirituality, education, writing, medicine, psychology and healing. His work is featured in the PBS documentary, Healing Words: Poetry and Medicine (2008). John has brought poetry as healer to pastoral care departments in medical schools and hospitals through the United States and internationally in Ireland, England, Israel, Kuwait, Germany, United Arab Emirates, South Korea and Canada. He is President of The Institute for Poetic Medicine, a nonprofit he founded in 2005. You can write to him at [email protected] and find out more about his work and the training provided by the Institute at www.poeticmedicine.org.


Dawn Gross

Hospice and Palliative medicine physician, educator, writer, public speaker, and radio host of Dying to Talk, Dawn M. Gross, MD, PhD, is dedicated to transforming the taboo around talking about death. A story-teller at heart, Dawn’s writing has appeared in several anthologies as well as The New York Times, JAMA, Annals of Internal Medicine and Science. Her first book of non-fiction is in the works.


Perry Guevara

Perry Guevara, PhD is at work on a book project, Inhuman Depressions, which brings together sixteenth and seventeenth-century literature, cognitive science, the history of medicine, and ecology. His interdisciplinary approach to literature is motivated by past experience in biomedical research, studying, at first, the genetic basis of Parkinson’s Disease and, most recently, the narratives of patients undergoing deep brain stimulation for treatment-resistant depression.


Kate Peper

Kate Peper is a freelance designer and award-winning watercolor painter. Her chapbook, Dipped In Black Water, won the New Womens’ Voices Award from Finishing Line Press, 2016. She was a recipient of a Marin Arts Council Individual Artist Grant for poetry and her work has been nominated five times for a Pushcart Prize. Her poetry has appeared in many journals including The Baltimore Review, Cimarron Review, Gargoyle, The Lindenwood Review, Rattle, Spillway, Tar River Review, and others. She lives just north of San Francisco with her husband and semi-feral dog, Hannah.


Kate Peper

Carlos Rodriguez, MA is a poet and playwright with poetry in various small presses/journals, and his one-act play, "A Place You Can Go," was performed in San Francisco through the Playwright's Foundation. He has studied creative writing at three universities - University of Arizona, University of CA - Davis, and Stanford University - and has taught creative writing at both UC-Davis and Dominican University of CA, where he currently teaches. His interest in narrative / poetic medicine stems from his study of the psychoanalytic endeavor of "putting words to feelings."


Marianne Rogoff

Marianne Rogoff, PhD is the author of the memoir Silvie's Life, which has been translated into Portuguese, adopted to teach medical ethics, and optioned for film. Six stories in her 2016 collection Love Is Blind in One Eye: 7 Stories were nominated for the Pushcart Prize. In 2017, a novella-in-flash was shortlisted for the international Bath Flash Fiction Award. Her travel stories have appeared in The Best Travel Writing and The Best Women’s Travel Writing, including a Solas Bronze Award. She has also published numerous essays and book reviews in The Rumpus, San Francisco Chronicle, and Bloomsbury Review.


Nina Schuyler

Nina Schuyler is the author of The Translator, which won the 2014 Next Generation Indie Book Award and was shortlisted for the William Saroyan International Writing Prize. Her first novel, The Painting, was nominated for the Northern California Book Award and was named a "Year's Finest Best Book" by the San Francisco Chronicle and a "fearless debut" by MSNBC. It’s been translated into Chinese, Portuguese, and Serbian. Nina’s stories have been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and her work has appeared in ZYZZYVA, Santa Clara Review, Fugue, The Meadowland Review, The Battered Suitcase, and other literary journals. She teaches creative writing at the University of San Francisco and writing classes at Book Passage. She lives in Northern California, with her husband and two sons.


Prartho Sereno

Prartho Sereno was the 4th Poet Laureate of Marin County (2015-2017) and author of three prize-winning poetry collections: Indian Rope Trick (forthcoming from Blue Light Press, 2018), Elephant Raga, and Call from Paris. She is also author/illustrator of an award-winning gift-book, Causing a Stir: The Secret Lives & Loves of Kitchen Utensils. She has been a California Poet in the School since 1999 and was awarded a Radio Disney Super Teacher Award in 2005 for that work. She is also the creator/facilitator of a popular, 12-years-and-running writing series at the College of Marin: "The Poetic Pilgrimage: Poem-Making as Spiritual Practice.” Prartho shares her enthusiasm for creativity in workshops that incorporate dance, music, and the visual arts with senior citizens, college students, incarcerated youth, and Alzheimer's patients.


giovanni singleton

giovanni singleton’s debut collection Ascension, informed by the music and life of Alice Coltrane, received the California Book Award Gold Medal. Her writing has also been exhibited in the Smithsonian Institute’s American Jazz Museum, San Francisco’s first Visual Poetry and Performance Festival, and on the building of Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. She is the 2017-18 Holloway Lecturer in Poetry at University of California-Berkeley and founding editor of nocturnes (re)view of the literary arts, a journal dedicated to experimental work of the African Diaspora and other contested spaces. Canarium Books recently published a collection of her visual work entitled AMERICAN LETTERS: works on paper. 


Gail Strickland

Gail Strickland —classicist, poet and musician—was recognized by The Baltimore Review & Writers’ Digest and published by the Oxford University Journal New Satyrica. Gail has translated much of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey. Her debut novel, Night of Pan, first book of the Oracle of Delphi Trilogy—a mythic journey of the young Oracle in ancient Greece—was published November 2014 by Curiosity Quills Press. With five-star reviews from The Literary Classics Review, Peter S. Beagle (author of The Last Unicorn), and Thanasis Maskaleris, Gail has presented talks worldwide, bringing us an historical fantasy based deeply on history and instilled with the spirit and poetry of an ancient time.

 

January 2018 Guest Speakers

Louise Aronson

Louise Aronson is a geriatrician, writer, professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and the author of the PEN/Bingham finalist, A History of the Present Illness. As a doctor, she was awarded an Arnold P. Gold Professorship promoting Humanism in Medicine, among other awards recognizing her teaching, doctoring, and professionalism. As a writer, she has won the Sonora Review Prize, New Millennium Writing Award, and fellowships from Hedgebrook, Ragdale and Ucross. Her essays and stories can be found in literary journals, newspapers, and medical journals, including the Narrative Magazine, Bellevue Literary Review, New York Times, Washington Post, Lancet, and the New England Journal of Medicine. You can learn more at Louise Aronson www.louisearonson.com or follow her on Twitter @LouiseAronson


Dan Bellm

Dan Bellm is a poet and translator. His fourth book of poems is Deep Well (Lavender Ink, New Orleans, 2017); his third, Practice (Sixteen Rivers Press, San Francisco), won a 2009 California Book Award. Recent translations include Speaking in Song, by Mexican poet Pura López Colomé (Shearsman Books, Bristol, UK, 2017), The Song of the Dead, by French poet Pierre Reverdy (Black Square Editions, New York, 2016), and Description of a Flash of Cobalt Blue, by Mexican poet Jorge Esquinca (Unicorn Press, Greensboro, NC, 2015). He teaches literary translation and poetry in the MFA in Creative Writing Program at Antioch University Los Angeles, and has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the California Arts Council. www.danbellm.com.


Mary Bisbee Beek

Mary Bisbee-Beek began a publishing career in 1979 in San Francisco, California. In 2003 she joined the University of Michigan Press, where she was the Director of Publicity and the Trade Marketing and Foreign Rights Manager. In 2008, she joined Literary Ventures Fund, where she worked as a marketing, publicity and foreign rights consultant with various authors, agents, and publishers. Currently her company is called READ A Unique Perspective as she approaches publicity, marketing, and foreign rights management with a unique outlook depending on the title and genre. She works on literary fiction, creative non-fiction, cerebral yet readable academic books, poetry, and photography that leans toward social documentary commentary. She frequently consults with the Publicity and Marketing committee for the Portland State University MFA for Publishing.


Kim Culbertson

Kim Culbertson is the award-winning author of the YA novels Songs for a Teenage Nomad (Sourcebooks 2010), Instructions for a Broken Heart (Sourcebooks 2011), Catch a Falling Star (Scholastic 2014), The Possibility of Now (Scholastic 2016), and The Wonder of Us (Scholastic 2017). Much of her inspiration for her novels comes from the work she’s done as a high school teacher since 1997. In 2012, Kim wrote her eBook novella The Liberation of Max McTrue for her students, who, over the years, have taught her far more than she has taught them. She currently lives in Nevada City, CA, with her husband and daughter.


Molly Giles

Molly Giles had a distinguished career teaching Fiction Writing at San Francisco State University and the University of Arkansas. She has published a novel, IRON SHOES, and four award-winning collections of short stories: Rough Translations, Creek Walk, Bothered, and, most recently, All The Wrong Places, which won the Spokane Prize for Fiction.


Robert Hass

Robert Hass’s books of poetry include the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award-winner Time and Materials: Poems 1997-2003 (2007) and Field Guide (1973), selected for the Yale Series of Younger Poets. His essay collection Twentieth Century Pleasures: Prose on Poetry (1984) won the National Book Critics Circle Award. Hass served as poet laureate of the United States from 1995 to 1997. He lives in California with his wife, poet Brenda Hillman, and teaches at the University of California, Berkeley.


Jane Hirshfield

Jane Hirshfield's eighth poetry book is The Beauty, long-listed for the 2015 National Book Award. She is also the author of Ten Windows: How Great Poems Transform the World and the now classic Nine Gates: Entering the Mind of Poetry, and editor and co-translator of four books collecting the work of world poets from the past. A poet equally of interior life and environmental, justice, and peace concerns, she's received fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations, NEA, and Academy of American Poets; the Poetry Center Book Award; and the California Book Award. A 2012-2018 chancellor of The Academy of American Poets, Hirshfield’s work appears in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New Republic, Harper’s, The Paris Review, Poetry, and eight editions of The Best American Poetry.


Terry Lucas

Terry Lucas is the author of two award-winning poetry chapbooks, Altar Call and If They Have Ears to Hear, and two full-length poetry collections: In This Room and Dharma Rain. His work has received numerous awards, including the 2014 Crab Orchard Review Feature Award in Poetry, the fifth annual Littoral Press Poetry Prize, and five Pushcart Prize nominations. Terry’s poems, reviews, and essays have appeared in dozens of national literary journals. He has taught in the Chicago Public School System as a Master Poet in the Von Steuben Metropolitan Science Center’s Writing Center. Terry is a graduate of New England College MFA and is the Associate Editor of Trio House Press, as well as a freelance poetry coach. More about Terry and his work can be found at www.terrylucas.com.


Marilyn Chandler McEntyre

Marilyn Chandler McEntyre is a writer and professor of medical humanities. She leads retreats and writing workshops. She cares about connecting spirituality, politics, food, healthcare, care for the earth and its creatures, for language and public discourse, and finding new ways to live together on a planet that needs healing. Her writing has appeared in The Christian Century, Weavings, Sojourners, Prism, Conversations, Christianity Today, Academic Medicine, Medical Humanities, Literature and Medicine, and a variety of other academic and trade publications. She earned her B.A. at Pomona College, M.A. at U.C. Davis, Ph.D. at Princeton University in Comparative Literature. She has taught at Princeton University, the College of New Jersey, Mills College, Dominican University and Westmont College and now teaches at the UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Medical Program.


Dawn McGuire

Dawn McGuire is a neurologist-poet and the author of four poetry collections, most recently American Dream with Exit Wound. She has received numerous prizes, including the Indie Book Award in Poetry and the Sarah Lawrence/Campbell Corner Prize for “poems that treat larger themes with lyric intensity.” Her work appears in Zyzzyva, Nimrod International, Narrative and numerous other literary magazines, and has been featured in a New Yorker poetry podcast.


Claudia Monpere

Claudia Monpere’s fiction and poetry appear in The Massachusetts Review, The Kenyon Review, New Ohio Review, Prairie Schooner, The Cincinnati Review, and elsewhere. Awards include a Hedgebrook Residency and the Georgetown Review Fiction Award. Claudia lives in Oakland, California and teaches writing at Santa Clara University.


Ann Pelletier

Ann Pelletier is the author of the poetry collection Letter That Never (The Word Works Press). Her manuscript, Strange Invention, has been a finalist for the ABZ, Black Lawrence, Burnside Review, New Issues and Word Works prizes. A Pushcart nominee, her work has been published in The Antioch Review, Hunger Mountain, Nashville Review, New American Writing, Requited, Volt, Zone 3, and other journals. Ann has divided her time between writing and working various jobs, from hospital nutritionist to administrative director of a hunger relief agency. She currently lives and writes both at Lake Tahoe and in Santa Cruz, California.


Dean Rader

Dean Rader’s debut collection of poems, Works & Days, won the 2010 T. S. Eliot Poetry Prize. Landscape Portrait Figure Form was published in 2014 and was named by Tess Taylor in the Barnes & Noble Review as one of the Best Books of Poetry of the year. He was won numerous awards for his writing, including the 2015 George Bogin Award from the Poetry Society of America. Rader is a professor of English at the University of San Francisco and the editor of the 2014 anthology 99 Poems for the 99 Percent. Two collections of poetry are forthcoming, including a book of collaborative sonnets written with Simone Muench, entitled Suture (Black Lawrence Press) and Self-Portrait as Wikipedia Entry (Copper Canyon).


Marianne Rogoff

Marianne Rogoff is the author of the memoir Silvie's Life, which has been translated into Portuguese, adopted to teach medical ethics, and optioned for film. Six stories in her 2016 collection Love Is Blind in One Eye: 7 Stories were nominated for the Pushcart Prize. In 2017, a novella-in-flash was shortlisted for the international Bath Flash Fiction Award. Her travel stories have appeared in The Best Travel Writing and The Best Women’s Travel Writing, including a Solas Bronze Award. She has also published numerous essays and book reviews in The Rumpus, San Francisco Chronicle, and Bloomsbury Review. Visit Dominican Scholar selected works to read more.


Zachary Rogow

Zack Rogow is the author, editor, or translator of twenty books or plays. His translations and cotranslations include Earthlight by André Breton, Horace by George Sand, and Shipwrecked on a Traffic Island and Other Previously Untranslated Gems by Colette. He is also writing a series of plays about authors, incorporating their writing into the action. The most recent of these, Colette Uncensored, ran for six months at The Marsh in San Francisco and Berkeley in 2016 and 2017. His blog, Advice for Writers, has 200 posts on topics of interest to writers. Currently he teaches in the low-residency MFA in writing at the University of Alaska Anchorage and serves as a contributing editor of Catamaran Literary Reader. Learn more at www.zackrogow.com


Elizabeth Rosner

Elizabeth Rosner is a bestselling novelist, poet, and essayist living in Berkeley, California. Her newest book is SURVIVOR CAFE: The Legacy of Trauma and the Labyrinth of Memory. Her third novel, ELECTRIC CITY was named among the best books of 2014 by National Public Radio. Her poetry collection, GRAVITY, was also published in 2014. THE SPEED OF LIGHT, Rosner's acclaimed debut novel in 2001, was translated into nine languages. Short-listed for the Prix Femina, the book won several literary prizes in both the US and Europe. BLUE NUDE, her second novel, was selected as one of the best books of 2006 by the San Francisco Chronicle. Rosner’s essays and poems have appeared in the NY Times Magazine, Elle, Poetry Magazine, and numerous anthologies. Her book reviews appear frequently in the San Francisco Chronicle.


Barbara Tomash

Barbara Tomash is the author of three previous books of poetry, Arboreal (Apogee 2014), Flying in Water, which won the 2005 Winnow First Poetry Award, and The Secret of White (Spuyten Duyvil 2009). An earlier version of PRE- was a finalist for the 2016 Colorado Poetry Prize and for the Rescue Press Black Box Poetry Prize. Her poems have appeared in Colorado Review, Denver Quarterly, Web Conjunctions, New American Writing, VOLT, Verse, OmniVerse, Witness, and numerous other journals. She lives in Berkeley, California, and teaches in the Creative Writing Department at San Francisco State University.


Matthew Zapruder

Matthew Zapruder is the author of four collections of poetry, most recently Come On All You Ghosts, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, Sun Bear, Copper Canyon 2014, as well as Why Poetry, a book of prose, from Ecco Press in August 2017. He has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a William Carlos Williams Award, a May Sarton Award from the Academy of American Arts and Sciences, and a Lannan Foundation Residency Fellowship in Marfa, TX. An Associate Professor in the MFA at Saint Mary’s College of California, he is also Editor at Large at Wave Books, and from 2016-7 held the annually rotating position of Editor of the Poetry Column for the New York Times Magazine. He lives in Oakland, CA.

 


 

June 2017 Guest Speakers

Ellery Akers

Ellery Akers is the author of two collections of poems, Knocking on the Earth and Practicing the Truth, as well as a children’s novel, Sarah’s Waterfall. She has won thirteen national writing awards, including the Poetry International Prize, the John Masefield Award, and an Independent Publisher Book Award. Her poetry has been featured on National Public Radio and has appeared in such journals as Poetry, The New York Times Magazine, The Sun, and The American Poetry Review. An award-winning visual artist as well, Akers has exhibited her artwork in museums and galleries nationally. She recently won the Watson Cross, Jr. Award from the National Watercolor Society.


Elsa Asher

Elsa Asher works at the intersections of narrative, illness, health and social justice. An educator who holds a Master’s of Science degree in Narrative Medicine from Columbia University, Elsa is also a writer, storytelling artist, Prenatal, Birth and Attachment Therapy Practitioner, Full-Spectrum Doula, an ordained Kohenet, and a Certified Doula. Elsa's graduate thesis included a 9 month intensive with storyteller and academy award-nominated filmmaker Murray Nossel, and concluded in the creation of the show Beautiful Terrible Things with Mary Bit Smith. Elsa has taught and presented work at Columbia University, Bastyr University, Antioch University, Kaiser Permanente Santa Rosa, California Academy of Family Physicians, and at various retreats, organizations and conferences across the country. You can find Elsa’s writing online and in print at The Intima, Mom Egg Review, TEACH, New Moon Project, Matter Press, and Re-Write. Elsa teaches Narrative Medicine at Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine and you can learn more about her and read some of her works at www.elsaasher.com


Ramona Ausubel

Ramona Ausubel is the author of Sons and Daughters of Ease and Plenty as well as No One is Here Except All of Us, winner of the PEN Center USA Literary Award for Fiction and A Guide to Being Born, a New York Times Notable Book. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Tin House, One Story, Ploughshares and elsewhere. She is a faculty member of the low-residency MFA program at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
(Winter 2018 Residency)


Carolyn Cooke

Carolyn Cooke's most recent book, Amor and Psycho, was named one of the ten best books of 2013 by Publishers Weekly. Her novel, Daughters of the Revolution, was named one of the ten best books of 2011 by The San Francisco Chronicle and one of the Reviewers' Favorite novels of that year by The New Yorker magazine. Her debut collection of fiction, The Bostons, was a winner of the PEN/ Bingham Award, a finalist for the PEN/L.L. Winship Award, a runner-up for the PEN/Hemingway Award, and was named one of the best books of the year by The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times. A recipient of fellowships from Bread Loaf, the National Endowment for the Arts, the California Arts Council, the Djerassi Foundation, Macdowell, Norton Island, Ucross Foundation, Vermont Studio Center, and the Corporation of Yaddo, she is a professor in the interdisciplinary MFA Program at California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco.


Iris Jamahl Dunkle

Iris Jamahl Dunkle is the 2016-2017 Poet Laureate of Sonoma County, CA. Her second poetry collection, There’s a Ghost in this Machine of Air (2015), tells the untold history of Sonoma County, CA. Her third collection, Interrupted Geographies, will be published by Trio House Press in June 2017. Her debut poetry collection, Gold Passage, was selected by Ross Gay to win the 2012 Trio Award and was published by Trio House Press in 2013. Her poetry, essays, and creative non-fiction have been published widely in numerous publications including Fence, Calyx, Catamaran, Poet’s Market 2013, Midwest Review, JMWW and Chicago Quarterly Review. She is currently co-authoring a new biography about Jack London’s wife, Charmian Kittredge London. Dunkle teaches writing and literature at Napa Valley College and is on the staff of the Napa Valley Writers conference. Her new poetry collection, There's a Ghost in this Machine of Air is available at: www.irisjamahldunkle.com.


Charles Entrekin

Charles Entrekin’s most recent works include The Art of Healing, a transformative poetic journey (Poetic Matrix Press, 2016); and Portrait of a Romance, a love story in verse (Hip Pocket Press, 2014). Charles was a founder and managing editor of The Berkeley Poets Cooperative and The Berkeley Poets Workshop & Press, and was a co-founder/advisory board member of Literature Alive!, a non-profit organization in Nevada County, California. He is co-editor of the e-zine Sisyphus, a magazine of literature, philosophy, and culture; and managing editor of Hip Pocket Press. Charles is the father of five children and lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with his wife, poet Gail Rudd Entrekin.


Gail Entrekin

Gail Rudd Entrekin is Poetry Editor of Hip Pocket Press and Editor of the online environmental literary magazine, Canary (www.canarylitmag.org). She is Editor of the poetry anthology Yuba Flows (2007) and the poetry & short fiction anthology Sierra Songs & Descants: Poetry & Prose of the Sierra (2002). Her poems have been widely published in anthologies and literary magazines, including Cimarron Review, Nimrod, New Ohio Review, and Southern Poetry Review, were finalists for the Pablo Neruda Prize in Poetry from Nimrod International Journal in 2011, and won the Women’s National Book Association Award in 2016. Entrekin taught poetry and English literature at California colleges for 25 years. Her books of poetry include The Art of Healing (with Charles Entrekin), Rearrangement of the Invisible, You Notice the Body, John Danced, and Change (Will Do You Good), which was nominated for a Northern California Book Award. She and her husband, poet and novelist Charles Entrekin, live in the hills of San Francisco’s East Bay.


John Fox

John Fox is a poet and certified poetry therapist. He is author of Poetic Medicine: The Healing Art of Poem-Making (1997) and Finding What You Didn't Lose: Expressing Your Truth and Creativity Through Poem-Making (1995) and numerous essays in a range of books on subjects of spirituality, education, writing, medicine, psychology and healing. His work is featured in the PBS documentary, Healing Words: Poetry and Medicine (2008). John has brought poetry as healer to pastoral care departments in medical schools and hospitals through the United States and internationally in Ireland, England, Israel, Kuwait, Germany, United Arab Emirates, South Korea and Canada. He is President of The Institute for Poetic Medicine, a nonprofit he founded in 2005. You can write to him at [email protected] and find out more about his work and the training provided by the Institute at www.poeticmedicine.org.


Louis B. Jones

Louis B. Jones is the author of the novels Ordinary Money, Particles and Luck, and California's Over, all three New York Times Notable Books, and most recently the paired novels Radiance and Innocence. His writing has appeared in Santa Monica Review and The Threepenny Review, and in the 2009 Pushcart Prize collection. He has taught at various colleges around the country and currently co-directs the Writers Workshops of the Community of Writers at Squaw Valley.


Kari Kiernan

Kari Kiernan is a writer and storyteller living in San Francisco. Her work has appeared in Skirt! Magazine and The Morning News as well as onstage at Porchlight, The Vent, Naked Truth and Opium Magazine’s Literary Death Match, among others. You can see more of her work at Cereal for Dinner Again www.cerealfordinnneragain.com.


Dave Madden

Dave Madden is the author of the story collection If You Need Me I'll Be Over There and the nonfiction book The Authentic Animal: Inside the Odd and Obsessive World of Taxidermy. His shorter work has appeared in Harper's, Prairie Schooner, Creative Nonfiction, Brevity, The Rumpus, and elsewhere, and he's received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Sewanee Writers' Conference, and the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference. He teaches in the MFA program at the University of San Francisco.


Elizabeth Percer

Elizabeth Percer is a three-time nominee for the Pushcart Prize and has twice been honored by the Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Foundation. She received a BA in English from Wellesley and a PhD in arts education from Stanford University, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship for the National Writing Project at UC Berkeley. She is the author of Ultrasound, a book of poems, and the novels An Uncommon Education and All Stories Are Love Stories. She lives in Northern California with her husband and three children.


Nina Schuyler

Nina Schuyler is the author of the award-winning novel, The Translator, which won the 2014 Next Generation Indie Book Award and was shortlisted for the William Saroyan International Writing Prize. Her first novel, The Painting, was nominated for the Northern California Book Award and was named a "Year's Finest Best Book" by the San Francisco Chronicle and a "fearless debut" by MSNBC. It’s been translated into Chinese, Portuguese, and Serbian. Nina’s stories have been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and her work has appeared in ZYZZYVA, Santa Clara Review, Fugue, The Meadowland Review, The Battered Suitcase, and other literary journals. She writes a column for www.FictionAdvocate.com on style and reviews books for The Rumpus and The Children’s Book Review. She attended Stanford University for her undergraduate degree, earned a law degree at Hastings College of the Law and an MFA in fiction with an emphasis on poetry at San Francisco State University. She teaches creative writing at the University of San Francisco and writing classes at Book Passage. She lives in Northern California, with her husband and two sons.


Susan Terris

Susan Terris is editor of Spillway Magazine and a poetry editor of Pedestal Magazine. Her most recent books are Take Two: Film Studies (Omnidawn Publishing, Fall 2017), Memos (Omnidawn Publishing), and Ghost of Yesterday: New & Selected Poems (Marsh Hawk Press). She is the author of 6 books of poetry, 16 chapbooks, 3 artist's books, and one play. Journal publications include The Southern Review, Denver Quarterly, Georgia Review, and Ploughshares. A poem of hers from Field appeared in Pushcart Prize XXXI. A poem from Memos, which was published by the Denver Quarterly was in Best American Poetry 2015.


David Watts

Dr. David Watts’ second book of stories, The Orange Wire Problem, along with Bedside Manners, embodies explorations into the complexities, ethics and mysteries of healing. He has published five books of poetry, one under his pseudonym, Harvey Ellis, and produced two CDs of “word-jazz.” He is a producer of the PBS program Healing Words: Poetry and Medicine and has been an on-camera television host for PBS, Lifetime Network, and KTVU-TV. He was elected to Best Doctors in America, an honor bestowed on the top five percent of practicing physicians. He founded two summer writing workshops for poets and writers with an interest in illness and healing, one at Sarah Lawrence College and another at Dominican University. A gastroenterologist at UCSF, he lectures throughout the USA in medical and nursing schools on how to keep compassion alive in a complex and hurried world.


Josh Weil

Josh Weil is the author of the novel The Great Glass Sea and the novella collection The New Valley. A Fulbright Fellow and National Book Foundation 5-under-35 honoree, he has been awarded The American Academy of Arts and Letters’ Sue Kaufman Prize, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, the GrubStreet National Book Prize, the Library of Virginia Literary Award, and a Pushcart Prize, among others. Having been the Grisham Writer-in-Residence at the University of Mississippi, the Distinguished Visiting Writer at Bowling Green State University, and on faculty in the graduate programs at Columbia University and Brooklyn College, he currently teaches in the low residency MFA program at Bennington College and lives with his family in California’s Sierra Nevada.


Al Young

Al Young is the author of 25 widely translated books. These include The Blues Don’t Change, Heaven, The Sound of Dreams Remembered, Coastal Nights and Inland Afternoons, and Something About the Blues), novels and essay collections. Appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, Young served as California’s poet laureate from 2005 through 2008. Other honors include NEA, Fulbright, Guggenheim Fellowships, and the 2011 Thomas Wolfe Award. Currently, as Distinguished Professor in the MFA in Writing Program at California College of the Arts, San Francisco, Young lectures on imaginative writing and creativity. Forthcoming books: 22 Moon Poems, October Variations, and Love Offline. He is included in The Best American Poetry 2016 (Edward Hirsch, Guest Editor).


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