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OLLI Spring and Summer 2014 Course Offerings

Spring Session
March 24 – May 23, 2014 

 
Spring Summer 2014 registration will officially begin on February 22 for Premium Members and March 3 for Basic Members.  To register, mail or email your enrollment form to the OLLI office or register by phone: (415) 458-3763.


Download the registration form here:

 

Download a one-page schedule or the interactive brochure here:



MONDAYS


MonkeysMonkeys, Fossils, and Mother Nature
Humankind occupies a unique place in the natural or biological world. As the peoples that now populate (and over populate) our planet, we are known uniquely as bio-cultural animals. This title describes the fact that we can no longer live solely by instincts or genetic inheritance. We are now equally reliant on learned behavior or culture. Through bio-cultural adaptation we have survived countless challenges from Mother Nature such as ice ages and prior global warming.  However, our cultural behavior also impacts the natural world today and it is important to remember, not all of our ancient kin survived Mother Nature’s challenges in the past.  Our ancestors’ fossil remains educate us in many ways but the larger question persists, what is the future of humankind today?  This class provides a lively odyssey through our relations and similarities with ancient primates as well as our living cousins, the monkeys and apes. In addition, we will evaluate far-away prehistoric sites where the human or hominid fossil record reveals our unique bio-cultural successes as well as our failures over time. 

Dianne Smith, PhD
holds a doctorate in Anthropology from UC Riverside and taught at UCR, CSULA and SRJC for over 30 years. She is a popular instructor winning SRJC’s highest teaching award as well as a national NISOD Medallion for excellence in teaching.  Her ethnographic fieldwork includes over two years in the Colombian Andes and short field projects in the Bahamas, India, Indonesia, Nepal and Thailand.  She is known for being a well-organized, knowledgeable and passionate instructor.

Mondays, March 24 – May 19, 2014
10:50 a.m. – 12:35 p.m. (8 classes) No class on May 12 (makeup class will be held on May 19)
Location: Angelico Concert Hall, Dominican Campus

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Welles and KubrickWelles & Kubrick: Modernists of Narrative Film
In two four-week blocks apiece, we will examine key films by Orson Welles and Stanley Kubrick, two innovative and distinctive American directors, each of whom pushed the “envelope” of narrative film language. With an early background in theater and radio, Welles made an indelible mark on film history, even while he managed to alienate himself from Hollywood. Kubrick was another polymath who began as a photographer and, while the studio system was in decline, would forge a personal imprint on numerous genres and literary adaptations. Films will be suggested for advance viewing, and clips will be used during class.

Richard Peterson
is Director of Programming for the Christopher B. Smith Rafael Film Center, a three-screen cinema owned and operated by the California Film Institute, the non-profit organization that also produces the annual Mill Valley Film Festival. He has presented programs and series at the Rafael since the beautifully restored theater’s re-opening in April 1999. Previously Peterson served as Film and Video Curator at Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Artistic Director for the USA Film Festival in Dallas and Curator of the Hollywood Entertainment Museum. He has taught film history on the university level and published essays and criticism.

Mondays, March 24 – May 12, 2014
1:40 – 3:25 p.m. (8 classes)
Location: Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican Campus

 

TUESDAYS
 

Creativity and ErosGreat Muses: Creativity and Eros
What do Rodin, Schumann, Brahms and Rilke all have in common?  Their greatest works were inspired (and sometimes co-created) by women who were every bit their artistic equal.  In this multidisciplinary class, we will explore the power of love in the creative process and celebrate the women hidden in the shadows behind their more famous male counterparts, particularly Clara Wieck Schumann, Fanny Mendelssohn, Camille Claudel, Lou Andreas Salome and Hypatia of Alexandria.

Kayleen Asbo, PhD completed her doctorate in Mythological Studies and three master's degrees: one each in music, psychology and mythology. She has taught at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music for the past 16 years, at Dominican University for six years, and she is also on the faculties of the OLLI programs at UC Berkeley and Sonoma State University. The artistic director for the Mythica Foundation of Arts and Education, Kayleen has also been the mythologist in residence for the San Francisco Opera during their production of The Gospel of Mary Magdalene. Dr. Asbo has repeatedly given lectures and workshops in Chartres, France, Assisi, Italy and Oxford, England on a wide variety of topics from women in history to Medieval music.

Tuesdays, March 25 – May 20, 2014
10:15 a.m. -12:00 p.m. (8 classes) No class on May 13 (makeup class on May 20)
Location: Angelico Concert Hall, Dominican Campus

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CleopatraShady Characters
There are the Famous and the Infamous; the Noteworthy and the Notorious.  This course focuses the spotlight on some of the shadiest characters in Western history - a regular Rogues’ Gallery of individuals who made a practice of pushing the boundaries of the permissible. Since each of these shocking figures personified the Shadow side for their respective society, their stories reveal a great deal about the nature of their respective times and places.  Devoting a session to each shady character, we begin our irreverent historical survey in the classical period with Dionysus, the black sheep of Greek mythology, followed by the sultry Egyptian temptress, Cleopatra. We proceed to the Baroque period for Caravaggio, the fiery painting master, and the tempestuous Mary, Queen of Scots. For the Romantic era, we get to study the ways of Casanova, adventurer of love, and the amorous George Sand, intrepid cross-dresser and gender pioneer. Our survey will culminate in more recent times with witty bon vivant Oscar Wilde and the intrepid explorer of mythic depths, Carl Jung. Class lectures will be augmented by extensive visuals and the occasional period costume.

Bruce Elliott, PhD, teaches courses in European History at Berkeley, Stanford Continuing Studies, and Dominican OLLI. British history constitutes a special enthusiasm for Bruce, as this was the field in which he conducted his doctoral research. Along with teaching in the academic year for several university programs, in the summertime, Dr. Elliott leads groups of his lifelong-learning students on travel-study trips to choice European destinations.

Tuesdays, March 25 – May 20, 2014
1:40 – 3:25 p.m. (8 classes) No class on May 13 (Makeup class to be held on May 20)
Location: Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican Campus

* Please note that the first class on March 25 will be held in Angelico Concert Hall, Dominican Campus


WEDNESDAYS
 

ChinaThe Peoples’ Republic of China: Its History and Political Economy
This course is comprised of a three-part survey of the history and political-economy of the Peoples’ Republic of China (PRC) in the period 1949-2012.   Part I offers a brief historical survey of the PRC from its founding in 1949 through the end of the Maoist Age in 1976. Part II analyzes the political economy of the PRC under  Deng Xiaoping, with its focus on economic reform and modernization from 1978 to 1997.  Part III reviews performance of the political economy during the critical fifteen years from the death of Deng Xiaoping in 1997 to the Chinese Communist Party’s 18th Party Congress in 2012.

Douglas Lee, PhD is a semi-retired professor, who teaches at De Anza College and San Francisco City College.  He has a BA from Lewis and Clark College, an MA from the University of Michigan, a PhD from UC Santa Barbara, and a JD from Lewis and Clark Law School.  His fields of specialization are modern Chinese history, Chinese American history, and Chinese law and political economy.

Wednesdays, March 26 – May 14, 2014
10:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (8 classes)
Location: Villa Marin100 Thorndale Dr. San Rafael

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American ArtTwentieth Century American Art
From the realist work of the Ash Can School painters to mid century Abstract Expressionism and the late century styles of Pop, Op, Minimalism and Conceptualism, this course will examine the major developments in twentieth century American painting.  George Bellows, Georgia Okeefe, Edward Hopper, Jackson Pollock and Andy Warhol are a few of the many American artists whose work will be considered.  Emphasis will be placed on understanding American art as expressive of American ideas and values – on the “Americanness” of American art. 

Wood Lockhart, PhD, studied architecture at Yale University and received his doctorate in the History of Art and Architecture from Northwestern University. He is the former Chair of the Art History Department at Dominican University and has been teaching at the university since 1975. Wood is also a retired United Airlines Captain with over a thirty-six year flying career. 

Wednesdays, March 26 – May 21, 2014
1:40 – 3:25 p.m. (8 classes) No class on May 14 (makeup class will be held on May 21)
Location: Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican Campus


THURSDAYS
 

Courtroom DramaCourtroom Drama in the Movies and Theater, Part IV
Our journey will include films of injustice: The Trial of Lincoln Assassination Conspirators and the Trial of the Father of the Atomic Bomb, J. Robert Oppenheimer; the classics "Anatomy of a Murder" and "Witness for the Prosecution"; the courtroom musical, "Chicago" and comedy "Legally Blonde"; rebellion at sea in "The Caine Mutiny" and the slave ship "Amistad"; and religious trials in "A Man for All Seasons"(actors will portray scenes) and "The Mountain Meadows Massacre and the Mormons". 

Oak Dowling, JD is a retired attorney with 43 years of practice, including 31 years in San Rafael. He is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Law School and a native of Chicago.  For 22 years he has been a part time law instructor at College of Marin.   In his law classes, he has used courtroom drama to demonstrate legal principles.  As an avocation, he has performed in theater in Marin and San Francisco over the past 15 years.

Thursdays, March 27 – May 22, 2014
10:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (8 classes) No class on May 1 (makeup class will be held on May 22)
Location: Congregation Kol Shofar215 Blackfield Dr., Tiburon

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LincolnLincoln’s Finest Hour:  Allies and Enemies in the Civil War
No world-historical figure walks onto the stage of history alone.  Every great figure works within a context of supporters and antagonists.  This course will examine Abraham Lincoln’s relationships with his “supporting cast,” including arch-rival Stephen Douglas, cabinet member William Seward, abolitionist leader John Brown, John Wilkes Booth, and others.  While we will build upon the framework laid down in the first Lincoln course, please note that this class will consist of all new material

Mick Chantler, MA, recently concluded his 36 year career in teaching at Sonoma Valley High School, and now works part-time as a counselor at Hanna Boys Center in Sonoma. As a lifelong student of the Civil War era, he was pleased to organize the Lincoln Bicentennial Celebration for the City of Sonoma in 2009. In 2010 he coordinated the seminars in American History series at the Sonoma Valley Library. Most recently, he taught his Lincoln course at the Sonoma State OLLI. Mick’s other interests include the history of baseball, and he is a long-standing member of the Society for American Baseball Research. He is also a member of the Lincoln Forum. Currently he is developing a course on Thomas Jefferson and the Early American Republic.

Thursdays, March 27 – May 15, 2014
1:40 – 3:25 p.m. (8 classes)
Location: Peacock Gap Clubhouse333 Biscayne Dr., San Rafael

 

FRIDAYS


Middle EastLevels of Conflict in the Middle East
The course will examine in depth three distinct and separate levels of conflict in the Middle East: the superpower conflict; the conflict between Israel and the Arab nation-states that surround her; and the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians. The course analysis will demonstrate that all three conflicts must be resolved to attain a comprehensive peace in the Middle East.

John F. Rothmann, MA is a politics/foreign policy consultant specializing in the US, the Middle East and the former Soviet Union. A talk show host on KGO–AM Newstalk radio, he is a frequent lecturer on American Politics and has been called “a scholar of modern Republicanism” while being acknowledged “for his unique insights, and in particular for rare and crucial materials.” Rothmann served as Director of the Nixon Collection at Whittier College from 1968 to 1970, as Chief of Staff to Senator Milton Marks, Field Representative to Senator Quentin Kopp, and in 1982 was one of the founders of the Raoul Wallenberg Jewish Democratic Club. Widely published and honored, Rothmann has spoken on more than 150 college/universities in the US, Canada and Israel and has been on the faculty of USF. Both his B.A. and his Masters in Arts in Teaching are from Whittier College. Prof. Rothmann is the co-author of Icon of Evil — Hitler’s Mufti and the Rise of Radical Islam.

Fridays, March 28 – May 16, 2014
10:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (8 classes)
Location: Congregation Kol Shofar215 Blackfield Dr., Tiburon

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US Financial SystemThe US Financial System: What it is and How it Developed
The course is intended to provide an overview of the US financial system and its historical development in terms of financial instruments, institutions and markets; and the economic functions it performs in terms of transferring resources.  It will also cover how financial systems differ in various countries and why.  The course will review the background of US financial and US banking regulation in broad terms, along with a review of the origin of the US central banking (celebrating its centennial this year).  The course will also cover the nature of the recent financial crisis in terms of the financial system (what it caused by bad actors acting badly or other factors?) and regulatory reforms enacted.  The course is intended for individuals who have some exposure to portions of the financial system but don’t have a full understanding and would like to see the various pieces of the US financial puzzle and how they fit together and interact. The course is not a discussion of monetary policy or a critique of various policies. Moreover, the course is not intended for financial professionals (though such professionals would be welcome to attend and contribute)

Larry Shotwell, PhD is a professional economist who has been teaching at several Bay Area universities.  In 2006 to 2007 Dr. Shotwell was a Fulbright Scholar at a university in China.  Prior to returning to teaching, Dr. Shotwell was an executive in the securities industry, worked as an economist and officer in a large corporation, and as an economist and junior officer in the Federal Reserve System.

Fridays, March 28 – May 23, 2014
10:00 – 11:45 a.m. (8 classes) No class on May 16 (makeup class will be held on May 23)
Location: Margaret Todd Senior Center1560 Hill Rd. Novato         

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Flash MemoirFlash Memoir   
This workshop uses the techniques of Flash Fiction to express the amazing, transforming and challenging moments of your life.  You will learn how to craft a mini-universe that speaks emotionally, shares your wisdom, and shines.   You will be given new techniques to develop your creativity in a safe, supportive environment. All writers are welcome, regardless of experience. Diane Frank's teaching style is joyful, loving, and intuitive.

Diane Frank, MA is an award winning poet and author of six books of poems, including Swan Light, Entering the Word Temple, and The Winter Life of Shooting Stars.  Her first novel, Blackberries in the Dream House, won the Chelson Award for Fiction and was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize.   Her new novel, Yoga of the Impossible, will be published in April.

Fridays, March 28 – May 23, 2014
10:50 a.m. – 12:35 p.m. (8 classes) No class on May 16 (makeup class will be held on May 23)
Location: Guzman 114, Dominican Campus

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Supreme CourtCurrent Issues Before the United States Supreme Court
Students will learn how the Court operates, chooses its cases and reaches decisions.  We will  study in detail ten of the most interesting and controversial cases currently awaiting the Court¹s ruling in areas such as Equal Protection of the laws,  religious freedom, freedom of speech and the Bill of Rights and vote on the outcomes.  Students will be encouraged to follow the arguments with internet research as guided by the instructor and to express their viewpoints in class discussion. 

Marshall W. Krause, JD has been a lawyer, a television reporter and a University teacher in addition to handling 7 cases before the US Supreme Court, winning 6 of them.  He served as Chief Attorney for the ACLU of Northern California, Professor of Political Science at S.F. State University, President of the Marin County Bar Association and the Barristers Club of San Francisco, and legal reporter for KQED’s “Newsroom.”

Fridays, March 28 – May 2, 2014
1:30 – 3:15 p.m. (6 classes)
Location: The Dance Palace503 B St. Pt, Reyes Station

  

Clubs

 

Am Fict Book ClubAmerican Fiction Book Club
In the spring session the club will focus on American novels that are profoundly influenced by race or ethnic group of the characters. Discussion will include focus on plot, character, setting, and style, with emphasis on racial and ethnic issues.
Moderator: Paul Prusiner, MD

Mondays, March 24, April 7, April 21, May 5, 2014
3:45 – 5:15 p.m. (4 classes)
Location:  Angelico 116, Dominican Campus
Maximum of 20 participants
Reading List:
March 24:
 Jhumpa Lahiri: The Lowland.
April 7: Cristina Garcia, Dreaming in Cuban
April 21: Phillip Roth, The Human Stain
May 5: Chaim Potok, The Chosen

 

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Theater ClubTheater Appreciation Club
This club will meet four times during the spring session.  Its purpose is to give members the opportunity to sample the excellent and varied community theater that exists in the North Bay.  Class meetings will be used to discuss playwrights and upcoming performances. Registrants for the course must purchase all theater tickets.
Moderator: Sandy Levitan, MA 

Mondays, March 31, April 14, April 28; May 19, 2014
3:45 – 5:15p.m. (4 classes)
Location:  Angelico 116, Dominican Campus
Maximum of 20 participants 

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Travel ClubTravel Club
Come get great ideas on where and how to travel internationally. The purpose of this informal group is for seasoned travelers to share their knowledge and experience with the beginning traveler. No experience is required to join and all experience is welcome. The moderators will from time-to-time select specific destinations or topics for discussion. Whenever possible, these will be announced in advance.
Moderator: Winnie Coleman, CTC  

Wednesdays, March 26, April 9, April 23, May 7, 2014 
3:45 – 5:15 p.m.  (4 classes)
Location: Science Center 227, Dominican Campus
Maximum 20 participants

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Historical Biography ClubThe Historical Biography Club
News flash! Dominican's OLLI program is pleased to announce the formation of a fifth club, to be known as The Historical Biography Book Club.  If you love reading about fascinating, provocative, and often enigmatic lives of great historical personalities, then you simply must come join the Historical Biography club!  The inaugural theme is "Charismatic and Enigmatic Leaders," with one book every two weeks, for a total of three books.  The first meeting will be used to discuss what makes up an historical biography.
Moderator: Douglas Lee, PhD

Wednesdays, April 2, April 16, April 30, May 21, 2014
3:45 – 5:15 p.m.
April 16: Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Autobiography of Nelson Mandela (1995)
 All other books to be determined
Location: Guzman 302, Dominican Campus
Maximum 20 participants 

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Poetry ClubPoetry Club
If writing poetry is an old love or a newly acquired one, let's meet at the Poetry Club. Read your own poems; listen to others read their poetry. Our goal is to provide honest feedback in a highly supportive and constructive environment. We'll share the inner experience of writing poetry as a vehicle for creativity and self-expression as well as the craft itself.  Outside resources, such as publications, websites and workshops will be shared and discussed.  Come to the Poet's Corner.
Moderator: Margo Ginsburg

Wednesdays, April 2, April 16, April 30, May 7, 2014
3:45 – 5:15 p.m.
Location: Guzman 306, Dominican Campus
Maximum 20 participants

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Guitar ClubGuitar Club: Hummin’ and Strummin’     
How would you like to create new neural pathways in your brain, develop small motor skills and reduce stress by learning to play the guitar?  We will cover the basic chords and strums on the guitar to enable you to play most songs. All who have wanted to learn guitar but were reluctant to try until now are invited.  Borrow or rent a guitar, bring your fingers and a positive attitude, and leave your singing inhibitions at home. 
Moderator: Joann Levin

Fridays, March 28 – May 23, 2014
3:15 – 4:45 p.m. (8 classes) No class on May 16 (makeup class will be held on May 23)
Location: Angelico 111, Dominican Campus
Maximum of 20 participants

 

 

Dominican OLLI Spring Lecture Series: The World


The WorldDominican’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute has made a commitment to provide stimulating lectures on a wide variety of topics throughout the academic year. Although the following lectures are free to OLLI members, we request that you register for them individually on the form provided in this brochure. To register please call the OLLI office at 415-458-763.  ($10 for non-members)  

All lectures are held in Guzman Lecture Hall from 1:40 to 2:55 p.m. on Friday afternoons.

Syria: The Evolution of a Civil War
The lecture explains how a tug-of-war between outside powers acting from self-interest led a dictator to hang on to power and ultimately caused a civil war. 
Amin Kalaf, Cultural Historian 
March 28, 2014

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Percussion Discussion – Indigenous Instruments from Africa, the Middle East and South America
Experience the riveting and mesmerizing sounds of drums and melodic percussion instruments from around the globe in this stimulating cross-cultural lecture/demonstration.
Ian Dogole, Global Music Educator, Performer and Recording Artist
April 11, 2014

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Natural History of Sharks and Surfers
This slide-illustrated lecture explains the important contribution sharks make to the health of our oceans, their current plight worldwide, and their occasional attacks on surfers and fishermen.
John McCosker, PhD, Senior Scientist and Chair, Department of Aquatic Biology, California Academy of Sciences   
April 25, 2014

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China’s Strategy for 21st Century Reforms
China's 3rd Plenum of the 18th Party Congress held in November 2013 outlined the Government's reform agenda until 2020. This lecture will cover the main components of these proposed reforms in the social, environmental and resource areas, the political, economic and cultural spheres.
Francoise LePage, PhD, Professor and Dean Emerita in the School of Business and Leadership, Dominican University of California
May 9, 2014

 

Special One-Day Event

 

BaseballMajor League Baseball: Players and Audience
Celebrate summer and baseball with an exciting lecture by Mick Chantler, OLLI Professor, followed by discussion with a distinguished panel of baseball experts, concluding with a baseball-themed barbeque lunch.

Miscreants of the Diamond:  Baseball’s Bad boys from Shoeless Joe to ARod
Baseball fans seem to be drawn to the sport’s rascals every bit as much as they idolize their clean cut heroes.   “Outed” PED users, known gamblers, and surly grumps have devoted followings that are as intense and loyal as those of gentlemen like Stan Musial and Ernie Banks and Cal Ripken Jr.  Join us as we stroll through a rogues’ gallery of the game’s misbehaving superstars, from the days of the Black Sox to Biogenesis.
Mick Chantler, MA

Panel Discussion: Bad Boys and Good Boys
Distinguished sports writers and announcers will discuss their interaction with players and their audience.  Is it possible to prevent stereotyping of highly visible players?  Does the audience need heroes and villains? Are these young players subject to special temptations?  Does money change them?

  • Dave Albee, Associate Director of Communications and Sports Journalist, Discussion Leader
  • Amy Gutierrez, San Francisco Giants TV personality, Comcast SportsNet  
  • John Shea, National baseball writer, The San Francisco Chronicle


Wednesday, June 11, 2014
9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Location: Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican Campus
$45 for Basic and Premium Members (price includes lunch)
$55 for non-members (price includes lunch)

 

 

Summer 2014
July 8 – August 1, 2014

 

TUESDAYS

 

PhilosophersFour Philosophers and a King
We will explore, examine and debate the worldviews of four philosophers and a King. Solomon, the possible author of the Book of Ecclesiastes, refines some of the philosophy and ethical speculations of Mesopotamia and Egypt. The philosophers have each made a unique contribution to western thought: Machiavelli, the father of political science and a pragmatist; Immanuel Kant, a compassionate idealist; Martin Buber, an active ethicist, and John Paul Sartre, a reflective thinker about the nature of human existence.

Henry Shreibman, PhD, Rabbi, DD, has been an adjunct faculty member over the last three years at Dominican University and University of California, Davis in Comparative Religion, History, Ethics, and Philosophy. In 2008 Dr. Shreibman was awarded the Teacher of the Year at Dominican University as an adjunct. He served as the Head of School of Brandeis Hillel Day School for 13 years and was on the governing board of the California Association of Independent Schools. Dr. Shreibman has been an observer of changes in the Middle East, having lived, worked and traveled in Israel and Egypt and as a member of the peace movement known as Peace Now.  

Tuesdays, July 8 – July 29, 2014
10:50 a.m. – 12:35 p.m. (4 classes)
Location: Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican Campus

 

WEDNESDAYS

 

BaseballHistory of Baseball, Part II:  Nirvana is Opening Day    
This summer we will continue our exploration of the remarkable hold which the Grand Old Game still exercises over the heart and soul of America.  We will tour the “Green Cathedrals” where the action unfolds,  describe the antics of baseball’s most colorful owners, and take part in that ancient ritual of arguing about the best (and worst) players of all time.  Finally, we will provide some easy and usable tips on how to appreciate the game at a deeper level.

Mick Chantler, MA, recently concluded his 36 year career in teaching at Sonoma Valley High School, and now works part-time as a counselor at Hanna Boys Center in Sonoma. As a lifelong student of the Civil War era, he was pleased to organize the Lincoln Bicentennial Celebration for the City of Sonoma in 2009. In 2010 he coordinated the seminars in American History series at the Sonoma Valley Library. Most recently, he taught his Lincoln course at the Sonoma State OLLI. Mick’s other interests include the history of baseball, and he is a long-standing member of the Society for American Baseball Research. He is also a member of the Lincoln Forum.

Wednesdays, July 9 – July 30, 2014
10:50 a.m. – 12:35 p.m. (4 classes)
Location: Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican Campus

 

THURSDAYS

 

Females of FilmFabulous Females of Film
From Mae West to Monroe and Ruth Gordon to Meryl Streep, cinema has given us leading ladies that enlighten, entertain and sometimes even inform our views of the American female.  What do they have in common; what characteristics set them apart?  Why does Cate Blanchett remind us of Kate Hepburn?  Does the feisty Bette Davis serve as Julia Robert’s role model?  When did the romantic female ideal go from Mary Pickford to Jean Harlow, Ava Gardner to Angelina Jolie?  The interaction between leading men and leading women will be studied, as well as the future of fabulous females in film. 

Jan Wahl is best known to the Bay Area for her incisive film criticism during appearances as KCBS Radio and KRON TV Film Critic and Entertainment Reporter. A graduate of San Francisco State with a degree in broadcast communication and arts, for 30 years Jan has been actively involved in the television and film industries.  First as a producer, stage manager and director on such TV programs as “Good Morning America,” Jan has always shared her love of entertainment with the community.  She is a two-time Emmy award winner and member of the Directors Guild of America. 

Thursdays, July 10 – July 31, 2014
10:50 a.m. – 12:35 p.m. (4 classes)
Location: Guzman Lecture Hall, Dominican Campus


FRIDAYS

 

American PresidentsThe Inaugural Addresses of American Presidents
From George Washington to Barack Obama, the inaugural addresses tell a fascinating story of our American Presidents and the times in which they lived.  During this class we will revisit their words, consider the moments at which they were spoken, and rank the speaker’s place in the pantheon of Presidents. 

John F. Rothmann, MA is a politics/foreign policy consultant specializing in the US, the Middle East and the former Soviet Union. A talk show host on KGO–AM Newstalk radio, he is a frequent lecturer on American Politics and has been called “a scholar of modern Republicanism” while being acknowledged “for his unique insights, and in particular for rare and crucial materials.” Rothmann served as Director of the Nixon Collection at Whittier College from 1968 to 1970, as Chief of Staff to Senator Milton Marks, Field Representative to Senator Quentin Kopp, and in 1982 was one of the founders of the Raoul Wallenberg Jewish Democratic Club. Widely published and honored, Rothmann has spoken on more than 150 college/universities in the US, Canada and Israel and has been on the faculty of USF. Both his B.A. and his Masters in Arts in Teaching are from Whittier College. Prof. Rothmann is the co-author of Icon of Evil — Hitler’s Mufti and the Rise of Radical Islam. 

Fridays, July 11 – August 1, 2014
10:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (4 classes)
Location: Congregation Kol Shofar215 Blackfield Dr., Tiburon

 


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